Akron Beacon Journal Editorial Board Praises Portman’s Bipartisan Eviction Crisis Act

January 13, 2020 | Portman Difference

In an editorial titled “It’s Time to Address our Eviction Crisis,” the Akron Beacon Journal editorial board praises Senator Portman’s new bipartisan Eviction Crisis Act. Portman introduced the legislation with Senator Michael Bennet (D-CO) last month to address the national housing crisis crippling millions of Americans who are struggling to rise into the middle class. The bipartisan legislation will shed light on the root causes of the eviction crisis, reduce preventable evictions, and limit the devastation to families when eviction is unavoidable. More than 75 national and Ohio based housing, civil rights, and homelessness groups have announced their strong support for the legislation. 

The Akron Beacon Journal editorial states: “In Congress, Republican U.S. Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio joined with Democratic U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado in December to introduce the Eviction Crisis Act, which would establish a federal committee to examine data and policies to help prevent evictions or reduce their impact. In addition, it would provide money to “track evictions, analyze laws involving tenants and landlords and examine the factors leading to evictions,” according to The Columbus Dispatch. Crucially, the legislation would also create an emergency fund to help tenants pay rent in extraordinary situations, Portman told the Dispatch... All of us — tenants, landlords or not — have an interest in seeing this issue resolved. Too much for too many is at stake.” 

Excerpts from the editorial can be found below and the full editorial can be viewed here.

 

It’s Time to Address our Eviction Crisis

Akron Beacon Journal

Editorial Board

January 11, 2020 

We’ve all heard the horror stories.

The evil landlord who refuses to make necessary repairs, or ignores black mold or insect infestations. Or worse.

The tenant from hell who disturbs all of the neighbors, or damages the property, or uses it as a drug lab. Or worse.

We probably don’t hear as often about the tenant who loses his job and can no longer afford the rent. Or about the landlord who has no choice but to raise the rent, above what her tenants can reasonably afford, to compensate for higher utility bills or property taxes or another built-in cost.

But it is increasingly difficult to avoid hearing about where such circumstances usually end — in evictions.

Fortunately, the problem is not going unnoticed.

In Congress, Republican U.S. Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio joined with Democratic U.S. Sen. Michael Bennett of Colorado in December to introduce the Eviction Crisis Act, which would establish a federal committee to examine data and policies to help prevent evictions or reduce their impact. In addition, it would provide money to “track evictions, analyze laws involving tenants and landlords and examine the factors leading to evictions,” according to The Columbus Dispatch.

Crucially, the legislation would also create an emergency fund to help tenants pay rent in extraordinary situations, Portman told the Dispatch.

“If you miss a rent payment, the emergency assistance fund would be there to help,” Portman said. “Lots of landlords would be interested. They don’t want to go through evictions.”

All of us — tenants, landlords or not — have an interest in seeing this issue resolved. Too much for too many is at stake. 

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